What is an interactive report? What is the obvious diff of such report compared with classical type reports?

Refer this
What is an interactive report?
What is the obvious diff of such report compared with classical type reports?

ANS:-
An Interactive report is a dynamic drill down report that produces the list on users choice.
diff:-
a) THE LIST PRODUCED BY CLASSICAL REPORT DOESN’T allow user to interact with the system
the list produced by interactive report allows the user to interact with the system.
b) ONCE A CLASSICAL REPORT EXECUTED USER LOOSES CONTROL.IR USER HAS CONTROL.
c) IN CLASSICAL REPORT DRILLING IS NOT POSSIBLE.IN INTERACTIVE DRILLING IS POSSIBLE.

What is a drill down report?
ANS:-
Its an Interactive report where in the user can get more relavent data by selecting explicitly.

. What is the meaning of ABAP editor integrated with ABAP data dictionary?

DDIC objects are data dictionary objects, anything that you can create via SE11, including Tables, Data Elements, Domains, Search Helps, Lock Objects, Views, structures, table types, etc.
The ABAP Dictionary centrally describes and manages all the data definitions used in the system. The ABAP Dictionary is completely integrated in the ABAP Development Workbench. All the other components of the Workbench can actively access the definitions stored in the ABAP Dictionary.
The ABAP Dictionary supports the definition of user-defined types (data elements, structures and table types). You can also define the structure of database objects (tables, indexes and views) in the ABAP Dictionary. These objects can then be automatically created in the database with this definition. The ABAP Dictionary also provides tools for editing screen fields, for example for assigning a field an input help (F4 help).

The most important object types in the ABAP Dictionary are tables, views, types (data elements, structures, table types), domains, search helps and lock objects

What does an EXEC SQL stmt do in ABAP? What is the disadvantage of using it?

Native SQL
Open SQL allows you to access database tables declared in the ABAP Dictionary, regardless of the database platform you are using. Native SQL allows you to use database-specific SQL statements in an ABAP program. This means that you can use database tables that are not managed by the ABAP Dictionary, and therefore integrate data that is not part of the SAP Web AS ABAP System.

As a rule, an ABAP program containing database-specific SQL statements will not run under different database systems. If your program will be used on more than one database platform, only use Open SQL statements.

What is open sql vs native sql?

Open SQL allows you to access database tables declared in the ABAP Dictionary regardless of the database platform that you R/3 System is using. Native SQL allows you to use database-specific SQL statements in an ABAP program. This means that you can use database tables that are not administered by the ABAP Dictionary, and therefore integrate data that is not part of the R/3 System.

As a rule, an ABAP program containing database-specific SQL statements will not run under different database systems. If your program will be used on more than one database platform, only use Open SQL statements.

u can also have a look at the foll. link if u need more details:
http://help.sap.com/saphelp_46b/helpdata/en/fc/eb3b8b358411d1829f0000e829fbfe/content.htm

What is a collect statement? How is it different from append?

Simple example :

Collect – when ever non numeric columns equal then it sums numeric value otherwise it works like append statement.

suppose you have internal table :

data : begin of itab occurs 0,
field1(3) type c, ” -> Non numeric
field2 type i, ” Numeric
end of itab.

itab-field1 = ‘ABC’.
itab-field2 = 100.
collect itab.

itab-field1 = ‘ABC’.
itab-field2 = 200.
collect itab.

loop at itab.
write:/ itab-field1,itab-field2.
endloop

output is : ABC 300

Since here collect will look at non numeric then it adds numeric columns.

data : begin of itab occurs 0,
field1(3) type c, ” -> Non numeric
field2 type i, ” Numeric
end of itab.

itab-field1 = ‘ABC’.
itab-field2 = 100.
collect itab.

itab-field1 = ‘ABD’.
itab-field2 = 200.
collect itab.

loop at itab.
write:/ itab-field1,itab-field2.
endloop

output is : ABC 100
ABD 200
Here it works like Append statement

What does an extract statement do in the ABAP program?

Extracts larger than 500KB are stored in operating system files. The practical size of an extract is up to 2GB, as long as there is enough space in the filesystem.

In contrast to internal tables, the system partly compresses extract datasets when storing them. This reduces the storage space required. In addition, you need not specify the structure of an extract dataset at the beginning of the program, but you can determine it dynamically during the flow of the program…

. Can you create a table with fields not referring to data elements?

Domains describes the technical characteristics of a table field.
Specifies a value range which describes allowed data values for the fields
Fields referring to the same domain (via the data elements assigned to them) are changed when a change is made to the domain
Ensures consistency.

Domain can be assigned to multiple data element but vice versa is not possible.

If we do not assign domain to a dataelement it is still valid.
But the disadvantage will be the value range will not be obtained.

what is data element?

Data Element:
It is used to describe the semantic definition of the table fields like description the field. Data element describes how a field can be displayed to end-user.

what is domain?

. Domains:
Domain is the central object for describing the technical characteristics of an attribute of an business objects. It describes the value range of the field.

Can a transparent table exist in data dictionary but not in the data base physically?

In the SAP dictionary there are three types of database tables:
– transparent table
– pooled table
– clustered table

For a transparent table there is an exact 1:1 relation between dictionary and database. If a table exists in the SAP dictionary with name “TABXYZ” and fields “MANDT”, “COL1” and “COL2”, then you will also find a database table named TABXYZ with fields MANDT, COL1 and COL2. The data type of a field in the dictionary is mapped to a data type of the underlying database system, e.g. with Oracle a field with type CHAR(n) in the dictionary becomes VARCHAR2(n) in the database.

A pooled table does not exist as a separate database table. Instead, groups of pooled tables are stored together inside a physical pool. At the database level there is only one table (namely the physical pool). This table has a field called TABNAME, which contains the name of the “logical” (i.e. pooled table) that each specific row belongs to. You can see this in the SAP dictionary: in SE12, enter “ATAB” as the table name and look at the structure. ATAB is the most important physical pool in the SAP database; in ECC 6 systems ATAB contains over 1800 pooled tables. The actual columns of a pooled table are not visible at database level: they are grouped together in the phsyical pool columns VARKEY (for the primary key fields) and VARDATA (non-key fields); both columns are of raw (binary) type. The database interface of the SAP kernel takes care of converting between these binary containers and the logical field names as defined in the dictionary.

Like pooled tables, clustered tables do not exist as separate database tables; they are part of a physical cluster. At the database level only the physical cluster exists as a table. Whereas with pooled tables, one row of the pool belongs uniquely to one logical table, one row of a physical cluster contains data of several clustered tables. The idea is that data of a “master” table is kept physically together with data of “subordinate” tables that share a cmmon primary key. This is beneficial for performance. Because the combination of the “header” row with its subordinate records may exceed the maximum size of a physical row in the cluster, the rows for a common key have a sequence number. You can for example look in SE12 at the cluster RFBLG (a cluster containing accounting tables). The first four fields of RFBLG (MANDT, BUKRS, BELNR, GJAHR) define the common part of the primary key of the master and subordinate tables. PAGENO is the sequence number. TIMESTMP is an internal timestamp, PAGELG the length of the page (binary data) and VARDATA holds the actual data in binary form. PAGENO, TIMESTMP, PAGELG and VARDATA exist in all clusters; the fields coming before this (common key fields) are specific to each cluster.

Transparent tables form the overwhelming majority. In the ECC 6 system I have here, there are 69984 transparent tables, 2019 pooled tables and just 77 clustered tables. That does not mean that they are unmiportant: pooled tables are often small but critical (mostly customizing) tables; and some of the most critical tables in the system are clustered, e.g. the core accounting table (BSEG, clustered inside RFBLG) or the change document tables CDPOS and PCDPOS (in physical cluster CDCLS).

I hope this clarifies things (at least if I got your question right